Offbeat Warfare Facts that Will Confound History Buffs
Offbeat Warfare Facts that Will Confound History Buffs

Offbeat Warfare Facts that Will Confound History Buffs

Khalid Elhassan - February 15, 2021

Offbeat Warfare Facts that Will Confound History Buffs
Major Yasumas Fukushima kicked off a trend of Japanese affection for Poland and the Poles. The First News

29. The Nineteenth Century Song That Aroused Japanese Sympathy for Poland

Japan and Poland are not exactly peas in a pod, but the Poles and Japanese had a common enemy: Russia. Russia had participated in repeated partitions of Poland that erased it as an independent country in the eighteenth century. For generations thereafter, Russia suppressed repeated uprisings by Polish nationalists seeking to revive and free Poland. In the second half of the nineteenth century, Japan emerged as a rising power in the Far East, whose ambitions in the region clashed with Russia’s. Mutual antipathy towards the Russians thus drew the Poles and Japanese together.

Offbeat Warfare Facts that Will Confound History Buffs
Japanese assaulting entrenched Russians during the Russo-Japanese War – a war in which Polish sympathies lay with Japan. Le Patriote Illustre

In the late nineteenth century, Japanese officer Yasumas Fukushima traveled through Poland. He liked the Poles, and was moved by the tragedy of the partitions that had extinguished Poland. When he returned to Japan, Fukushima’s writings struck a chord, and inspired “The Memory of Poland”, a poem about a country that had lost its freedom. When it was set to music, “The Memory of Poland” became a smash hit that took Japan by storm and aroused sympathy for Poles. When Poland regained her independence after World War I, Japan supported her admission to the League of Nations. In the interwar years, the two countries cooperated, especially in espionage against Russia’s successor state, the Soviet Union.

Offbeat Warfare Facts that Will Confound History Buffs

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