Women of Peace and Those Sided the Wrong of World War II
Women of Peace and Those Sided the Wrong of World War II

Women of Peace and Those Sided the Wrong of World War II

Khalid Elhassan - November 20, 2020

Women of Peace and Those Sided the Wrong of World War II
A restored IS-2 tank. YouTube

2. Aleksandra Boyko and Her Husband Bought a Tank to Fight to Nazi Invaders

Soon after the Nazi onslaught against the USSR, Aleksandra and Ivan Boyko tried to join the Red Army. However, draft officials refused because both had essential jobs. Ivan was a superb heavy truck driver, while Aleksandra performed essential clerical work for her department. It was decided that they were more valuable to the war effort continuing in those jobs, than serving in the military. So the couple figured out another way to get into the fight.

During the war, Soviet citizens could directly pay for specific new tanks and planes, and donate them to the military. In 1943, the couple donated 50,000 rubles from their savings to pay for a new IS-2 heavy tank, and wrote a letter to Stalin, asking for the right to drive it into battle. Stalin agreed, and the Boykos were trained as tankers in Chelyabinsk Tank School. Ivan became a tank driver, while Aleksandra became a tank commander – the only woman to command a heavy tank during WWII. Their technically “private” tank was officially named “Kolyma”, after the Kolyma River near the couple’s home in Siberia.

Women of Peace and Those Sided the Wrong of World War II
Aleksandra Boyko and her husband, Ivan. Reddit

1. This Heroine Fought the Nazi Forces From the Baltics to Central Europe

After graduating from tank school, Aleksandra Boyko was commissioned as a lieutenant. She arrived at the front with her husband in 1944, in the couple’s brand new IS-2 heavy tank – she as commander, he as driver. The Boykos first saw combat in the Riga Offensive, during which Aleksandra’s tank destroyed five Nazi tanks, including a Panzer VI Tiger, and two guns. For her exploits, she was awarded the Order of the Patriotic War, First Class.

A few months later, the Boykos’ tank was hit, and Aleksandra and Ivan were seriously injured. Their tank was repaired, and the couple eventually recovered from their wounds and returned to the front. All in all, Aleksandra and her husband fought from the Baltics, through Belarus, into Poland, and eventually ended up in Czechoslovakia at war’s end. Upon demobilization, Aleksandra returned to Magadan, where she ran a bakery, and was eventually elected to the City Council. Unfortunately, the Boykos did not live together happily ever after. The couple divorced in the 1950s. Ivan died in 1995, and Aleksandra followed him a year later.

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Where Did We Find This Stuff? Some Sources and Further Reading

All That is Interesting – Zinaida Portnova: The Teenage Partisan Who Became a Soviet Hero During World War II

CMG Worldwide, Josephine Baker’s Official Site – Josephine Baker’s Biography

Cracked – 17 Stories of Women Who Fought Against the Nazis

Encyclopedia Britannica – Josephine Baker, French Entertainer

History of Sorts – The Murder of the Goebbels Children

Jerusalem Post, August 27th, 2017 – Nazi Goebbels’ Descendants Are Hidden Billionaires

Jewish Partisan Educational Foundation – Eta Wrobel

Jewish Virtual Library – The Revolt at Auschwitz-Birkenau

Jones, Sherry – Josephine Baker’s Last Dance (2018)

Boy and Girl in a Tank: How a Soviet Couple Bought a Tank and Drove Off to Battle

National Women’s History Museum – Josephine Baker

Ranker – The Tragic Story of the Goebbels Children, Adolf Hitler’s Favorite Kids

Spiegel, October 9th, 2009 – Murder in Hitler’s Bunker: Who Really Poisoned the Goebbels Children

State Historical Society of Missouri – Josephine Baker

Sydney Morning Herald, October 10th, 2009 – Papers Reveal How Goebbels Children Were Killed

Telegraph, The, October 8th, 2009 – Court Papers Shed Light on Killing of Goebbels Children

Wikipedia – Goebbels Children

Wikipedia – Sonderkommando

Wrobel, Eta – My Life My Way: The Extraordinary Memoir of a Jewish Partisan in WWII Poland (2006)

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