16 Reasons Why the Da Vinci Code is Full of Inaccurate History
16 Reasons Why the Da Vinci Code is Full of Inaccurate History

16 Reasons Why the Da Vinci Code is Full of Inaccurate History

Trista - October 29, 2018

16 Reasons Why the Da Vinci Code is Full of Inaccurate History
Il Cenacolo or L’Ultima Cena, The Last Supper, by Leonardo da Vinci. Public Domain / Wikipedia.

1. Leonardo Da Vinci Did Not Paint Mary Magdalene

The title of The Da Vinci Code comes from the idea that Leonardo Da Vinci’s painting The Last Supper features not Jesus and 12 male disciples, but rather Jesus sitting next to a woman, Mary Magdalene. The two are positioned in such a way that their hips touch each other’s, but their bodies move apart, forming a “W” shape, signifying a vessel or the female womb. A larger “M” shape can be found in the painting, which stands for “Magdalene” or “matrimonious,” indicating that the two were married. Various other clues can supposedly be found in other paintings by the same painter, and Robert Langdon had to decipher these clues in his quest to find the Holy Grail and recover the sacred feminine that was supposedly revered by the early church.

The problem is that placed into the context of what we know about Leonardo Da Vinci, and his other paintings, the figure in question was, in fact, the disciple John, not Mary Magdalene. Da Vinci painted numerous pictures of effeminate young men who appear to have androgynous features. His final painting was of John the Baptist, and he seems to have feminine features which could lead to him being mistaken for a female. The same idea is apparent in The Mona Lisa, who is a female with androgynous features.

Additionally, Da Vinci was known to be a trickster who enjoyed using his work to mess with people’s minds. In fact, the notorious Voynich Manuscript, which a myriad of researchers have attempted to interpret but have found to be impossible, may have been written by him when he was a child, purely as a means of confusing people.

 

Where did we find this stuff? Here are our sources:

“Gospel of Jesus’s Wife.” Harvard University.

“Rosslyn Chapel: Da Vinci Code’s Holy Grail Theory Debunked,” by George Mair. The Scotsman. January 13, 2016.

“Catharism.” Wikipedia.

“The Real Da Vinci Code with Tony Robinson.” DocumentaryTube.

“Pierre Plantard.” Wikipedia.

“Merovingian Dynasty.” Wikipedia.

“Opus Dei.” BBC. August 10, 2009.

“The Da Vinci Code” Dan Brown

“Da Vinci Code Ideas ‘Were Not Copied'”. The Guardian.

“Jesus’ Marriage to Mary the Magdalene Is Fact, Not Fiction”. Huff Post.

“The “Bride of Christ” Is Not the Church”. Owlcation.

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