This Cantankerous Engineer Built the United States Nuclear Navy
This Cantankerous Engineer Built the United States Nuclear Navy

This Cantankerous Engineer Built the United States Nuclear Navy

Larry Holzwarth - March 31, 2022

This Cantankerous Engineer Built the United States Nuclear Navy
President Reagan’s Secretary of the Navy John Lehman forcibly retired Rickover in 1982. National Archives

20. Rickover was forcibly retired in January, 1982

On January 31, 1982, Rickover was retired from the Navy, after 63 years of continual service, spanning the administrations of 13 Presidents, from Woodrow Wilson to Ronald Reagan. According to Rickover, he learned of the fact from his wife, who heard a radio report on the subject. Rickover refused an offer to serve as a special adviser on nuclear matters in typically salty terms when Reagan told him of it in the Oval Office. Shortly after removing Rickover the Navy closed its investigation into Electric Boat and General Dynamics and paid most of the overrun claims, $634 million. In February 1983, a private retirement party was held in Rickover’s honor, with former Presidents Nixon, Ford, and Carter all in attendance. President Reagan did not attend. Nor did representatives from Electric Boat, with whom he had often clashed late in his career.

During his career, his Nuclear Power Program created a record of reliability and safety second to none. The US Navy, with well over 100 reactors built and operated under Rickover’s guidance, has never had an accident or incident which led to radiation leakage. The pressurized water reactor developed for his program, and in large part to his design, currently powers all US Navy nuclear submarines and surface ships. US Navy ships and submarines have steamed almost 200 million miles, underway on nuclear power. Admiral Rickover died in 1986, and after funeral services held at the National Cathedral in Washington was buried in Arlington National Cemetery. Two years before his death he attended the commissioning of the USS Hyman G. Rickover, a Los Angeles class attack submarine. One of Rickover’s maxims, regarding good ideas, is displayed at the US Navy Museum. “They must be driven into practice with courageous impatience”.

Where do we find this stuff? Here are our sources:

“Hyman G. Rickover”. Biography, Atomic Heritage Foundation. Online

“Recollections of Margaret Lurie”. Margaret Lurie, USS Hyman G. Rickover Commissioning Committee. Online

“Admiral Hyman Rickover”. Interview, Diane Sawyer (transcript) 1984

“Salvage and Repair of USS California”. Article, Naval History and Heritage Command. Online

“Rickover: Controversy and Genius”. Norman Polmar, Thomas B. Allen. 1982

“Nuclear Navy 1946 – 1962”. Richard G. Hewlett, Francis Duncan. Online

“Powering the Navy”. Article, National Nuclear Security Administration, Department of Energy. Online

“History of USS Nautilus”. Article, Submarine Force Library and Museum. Online

“Hyman George Rickover”. Biography, Yourdictionary.com. Online

“Past, Present, and Future”. Nuclear Engineering International. April 30, 2001

“Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor Remarks”. Jimmy Carter, Hyman Rickover, American Presidency Project. December 2, 1977. Online

“Why did the US abandon a lead in reactor design?” Cheryl Rofer, Physics Today. August 7, 2015

“Carter extols old Navy boss Rickover”. Article, UPI. July 9, 1986. Online

“This Legendary Admiral Had A Ruthless Approach To Job Interviews”. Gus Lubin, Business Insider. April 13, 2014. Online

“Any Other Name: The Origination of HMS Dreadnought”. Article, Airspace Historian. November 28, 2014 Online

“Public Policy: Rickover’s Attack on Defense Contractors”. Article, TIME Magazine. November 9, 1962

“Atomic Submarine USS Thresher Sinks in the Atlantic, Killing All on Board”. Article, History.com. Online

“Doing a Job”. Speech, Admiral Hyman Rickover at Columbia University. Online

“Overrun Silent, Overrun Deep”. Evan Thomas, TIME Magazine. December 24, 1984

“Rickover Linked By House Panel To Gifts From Shipbuilders”. Wayne Biddle, The New York Times. July 19, 1984

“Rickover Is Forced To Retire”. George C. Wilson, The Washington Post. November 14, 1981

“Admiral Hyman Rickover Dead at 86”. Article, Jewish Telegraphic Agency. July 9, 1986

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