The Nigerian Prince Scam Is Actually Hundreds of Years Old, But Continues to Scam People Today
The Nigerian Prince Scam Is Actually Hundreds of Years Old, But Continues to Scam People Today

The Nigerian Prince Scam Is Actually Hundreds of Years Old, But Continues to Scam People Today

Trista - April 4, 2019

The Nigerian Prince Scam Is Actually Hundreds of Years Old, But Continues to Scam People Today
An example of a craigslist scam ad. Moller Marketing.

1. Scammers and Hackers Continue Today

Airbnb cracked the code for growth hacking when it figured out how to automatically list properties on its website simultaneously on Craigslist. That way, if someone were searching Craigslist for a place to stay, they would come across Airbnb listings. Some scammers are also expert hackers; they have managed to gain access into people’s accounts to gain a wider audience. Some might hack into the email account of people who are selling something via Craigslist (or another website) and set up an automatic reply, saying something to the tune of, “Send $700 to this address, and I’ll send you the key.”

Other scammers might hack straight into Craigslist and take over an ad. Others – much less sophisticated – will post fake ads on a website listing homes for rent. They’ll post an ad for a lovely home that is quite reasonable for the location and quality, then request that you send them money before you view the property. To make sure that you never fall for an online scam, make sure that you never send anyone money before meeting that individual and verifying that this person does have the credentials to sell or lease whatever he or she claims to be offering.

 

Where Did We Find This Stuff? Here Are Our Sources:

“Advance-fee scam.” Wikipedia.

“12 Reasons You Should Care About the Nigerian Prince Scam,” by Julia Austin. Moguldom. December 22, 2014.

“Nigerian (419) Scam.” Snope.

“The ‘Nigerian Prince’ Scam Is Actually 200 Years Old,” by Melissa Brinks. Ranker.

“The Man Who Sold The Brooklyn Bridge Twice a Week for 30 Years.” Blog Tyrant.

“Americans Losing More Money to Phone Scams,” by Catherine Fredman. Consumer Reports. February 3, 2016.

“U.S. Internet fraud at all-time high / ‘Nigerian’ scam and other crimes cost $198.4 million,” by Eric Rosenberg. Hearst Newspapers. March 31, 2007.

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