Strange and Delightful Holiday Traditions of the Victorian Era
Strange and Delightful Holiday Traditions of the Victorian Era

Strange and Delightful Holiday Traditions of the Victorian Era

Alli - November 15, 2021

Strange and Delightful Holiday Traditions of the Victorian Era
Believe it or not, Michael Faraday delivered his 1855 Christmas Lecture “The Distinctive Properties of Common Metals” to a packed crowd of London’s rich ad powerful. Even in attendance was Prince Albert and several other royals. Hunterian Museum Collection

The Victorians Loved to Merge Science and Christmas Together (Part One)

These days, the only science involved in Christmas is domestic science; namely for how long and at what temperature to cook the turkey so as neither to poison the guests nor incinerate the bird. However, surprising though it may seem, science once played as important a role at Christmas time as gift-giving or cracker-pulling do now. This was in no small part down to the fact that just as Christmas was undergoing its transformation to become a popular festival, so too was science coming to capture the minds and intrigue the imaginations of Victorians the land over.

Newspapers, books, magazines; all advertised family-friendly, science-related Christmas presents and experiments that could be purchased and practised at home. Not that science mania was only confined to the home of course. Pantomime productions took up science-related themes, and in the 1830s London’s Adelaide Gallery started putting on productions of popular musical pieces—Hayden’s “Creation” and Handel’s “Messiah”, for example—which featured electrical light shows or giant projections of microscopic organisms.

Strange and Delightful Holiday Traditions of the Victorian Era
The Victorian Age was filled with scientific exploration. Wikimedia.

The Victorians Loved to Merge Science and Christmas Together (Part Two)

In the late 1840s, John Henry Pepper, the show business scientist of Victorian Britain, arrived on the scene to really spice things up. He treated the Victorians to a number of scientific marvels, transforming the Royal Polytechnic Institution (of which he was head) into a winter wonderland of electric lights, wacky inventions, and an enormous Christmas tree packed full of scientific gifts for children. The real showstopper, though, was “Pepper’s Ghost”. Aghast crowds would be treated to an uncannily lifelike phantom floating onstage; the projected plate-glass reflection of an actor concealed from view in another room.

There is, however, one yuletide tradition that has yet to fall by the wayside. Every year since 1825 (excluding 1939 – 42 when any would-be participants were too busy fighting the Germans), the Royal Institution in London has held its annual Christmas Lecture. The man behind the idea was renowned scientist Michael Faraday, who delivered 19 of them himself. The lectures were aimed at a general audience, and those giving them sought to deliver a scientific topic in an engaging, accessible way. Guest speakers throughout the years have included Sir David Attenborough and Richard Dawkins.

Where do we get this stuff? Here are our Sources:

https://www.britannica.com/summary/Notable-Characters-in-the-Works-of-Charles-Dickens

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/jack-in-the-green

almanac.com/…/where-does-the-term-bel-fire-come

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factory_Acts

https://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/serial?id=lhj

fidmmuseum.org/…/sarah-elizabeth-crafts-easter-bonnet-1852

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anfield

https://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/HistoryofBritain/Victorian-Workhouse/

https://www.bbc.co.uk/victorianchristmas/history.shtml

http://www.historyisnowmagazine.com/blog/2021/10/18/the-rise-of-spiritualism-in-19th-century-america

https://www.graceport.com/blog/the-legend-of-stingy-jack

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/mistletoe-the-evolution-of-a-christmas-tradition-10814188/

https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/full/10.14318/hau7.3.027

https://www.victorianvoices.net/topics/holidays/index.shtml

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_Victoria

https://www.rigb.org

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