Separate Truth From Fiction with These 7 Accounts of Historical Hoaxes
Separate Truth From Fiction with These 7 Accounts of Historical Hoaxes

Separate Truth From Fiction with These 7 Accounts of Historical Hoaxes

Maria - June 22, 2016

3. The Etruscan Warriors

Separate Truth From Fiction with These 7 Accounts of Historical Hoaxes

New York City’s Metropolitan Museum of Art has always acquired exquisite pieces. Yet, in the 1920’s, they were granted three life-size, Etruscan, terracotta warriors that they believed were made in the 5th century B.C. The warriors’ authenticity was criticized by some experts, yet many claimed the figures were real.

The answer was eventually settled when, in 1960, scientific testing debunked the initial idea, stating that the warriors were of modern origin. The statues had been made by a group of Italian men who modeled them after tinier figures they’d seen at museums beforehand, decades before the truth was found out.

2. The Skull of Calaveras County

Separate Truth From Fiction with These 7 Accounts of Historical Hoaxes

In 1866, while digging in a mine under volcanic deposits, miners in Calaveras County, California came across a human skull nestled 100 feet deep. Harvard University professor and California state geologist Josiah Whitney initially believed it could date back to the Pliocene age, which would make it over 5 million years old.

He was later proved wrong as news surfaced about local men playing Whitney for a fool.

1. The Invention of the Bathtub

Separate Truth From Fiction with These 7 Accounts of Historical Hoaxes

Journalist H.L. Mencken decided to take it upon himself to test the American public on their gullibility. In 1917, “The Evening Mail” newspaper ran a story by called “A Neglected Anniversary,” about the public not celebrating the 75th anniversary of the invention of the bathtub. Despite the article being filled with lies and random, fabricated details of the bathtub’s history, the public ate it up and believed every word of Mencken’s story.

It went so far as to be reprinted in multiple newspapers, while some details even appeared in reference books. Mencken later tried to admit his guilt in print, but numerous people still continued to believe the concocted story.

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