Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare

Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare

Jacob Miller - November 3, 2017

Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
Canadian Corps. infantrymen clean up and prepare food in a trench that shows signs of heavy fighting. Saskatchewan Military Museum
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
French soldiers wearing gas masks in a trench, 1917. gas mask technology varied widely during the war, eventually developing into an effective defense, limiting the value of gas attacks in later years. Bibliotheque Nationale de France
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
French troops throw rocks at advancing German troops from their hillside trench in the Vosges, 1916. Buzzfeed
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
Gas-masked men of the British Machine Gun Corps with a Vickers machine gun during the first Battle of the Somme. Buzzfeed
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
German troops wearing gas masks and throwing hand grenades, 23 April 1916. Buzzfeed
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
In this 1915 file photo, a Turkish soldier takes aim at British troops, while another watches carefully, from a trench in Gallipoli, Turkey. Archive photo, The Associated Press
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
Men of the 3rd Batallion, Royal Fusiliers manning a trench in Salonika. International War Museum
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
Officers of 12th Royal Irish Rifles wading through mud in a trench at Essigny, France. International War Museum
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
Officers of the Royal Engineers in a communication trench. International War Museum
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
Shrapnel bursts over a reserve trench in Canadian lines during the Battle of the Somme. Buzzfeed
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
Soldiers in trenches during write letters home. Life in the trenches was summed up by the phrase which later became well-known- Months of boredom punctuated by moments of extreme terror. The Atlantic
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
The wounded are dressed in a trench during the Courcelette operation of the Battle of the Somme, France, on 15 September 1916. Buzzfeed
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
Infantry from the 2nd Battalion, Auckland Regiment, New Zealand Division in the Switch Line near Flers, taken some time in September 1916, after the Battle of Flers-Courcelette. Archive photo, The Imperial War Museum
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
In this 1916 photo, German troops man a machine gun post from a trench at the Vistula River in Russia during the First World War. Archive photo, The Associated Press
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
A ration party of the Royal Irish Rifles in a communication trench during the Battle of the Somme. The date is believed to be 1 July 1916, the first day on the Somme, and the unit is possibly the 1st Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles (25th Brigade, 8th Division). The Imperial War Museum
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
Russian trenches in the forests of Sarikamish. Archive photo, The Imperial War Museum
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
Captain Leslie Morshead in a trench at Lone Pine after the battle, looking at Australian and Ottoman dead on the parapet. Archive photo, Australia War Memorial
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
Guy Drummond with his comrades in the trenches at Passchendaele in 1914. Archive photo, McCord Museum
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
Draining Trenches. 22nd Infantry Battalion (French Canadian). July 1916. Dept. of National Defence, Library, and Archives Canada
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
Jean de Bloch was a Polish financier and pacifist during the First World War era who wrote that trench warfare and weapons development had skewed military conflict in favor of the defensive side, and that it would cause conflicts to drag on and cost more in lives and financial losses. Fox Photos, Getty Images
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
French artillery officers relay instructions to adjust cannon fire in a trench on the front line, at an unknown location in France. Telegraph
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
A French soldier aiming an anti-aircraft machine gun from a trench at Perthes les Hurlus, eastern France. Telegraph
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
French officers inspecting trenches on the Argonne front, eastern France May 1916. Telegraph
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
Australian ambulance workers near Bernafay, transporting men suffering from trench foot to hospital. Australian War Memorial
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
Stretcher bearers in the mud, Passchendaele, August 1917. Wikipedia
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
Aerial view: the location and timing of this view are unknown but it shows something of the scale of trench systems which were used by both the Allies and the Germans. There is very little evidence of shell damage, suggesting that these are newly entrenched areas – which could either by the start of the war or more likely towards the very end when the movement had resumed. They could also be training trenches, although their scale makes that unlikely. On the left of the picture, the trenches have a regular pattern but angular sections jutting out. This was intended to allow for sniper fire to protect against an incursion from no man’s land. Across the top of the picture is a lengthy communications trench, which zig-zags to make sniper fire more difficult, and also to make it more difficult for artillery fire to rake it. It connects to other what are more likely to be front line trenches, which are in two rows running from top to bottom of the picture. Dailymail
Mud, Blood, and Death: Photos That Show the Realities of Trench Warfare
Damage: This photograph shows how the countryside was covered in shell craters from the aerial bombardment campaign carried out by both sides. The picture is one of the few which has information on it, dated 24 June 1917 top right corner. The date is shortly after the Battle of Messines had been launched. it is not known if this is in that area, but the scale of damage suggests a heavy bombardment. The remains of the roads which covered the area can still be seen. Dailymail

Advertisement