We Can Do It! 30 Vintage Photos That Will Change Your Perception of Women Factory Workers in WWII
We Can Do It! 30 Vintage Photos That Will Change Your Perception of Women Factory Workers in WWII

We Can Do It! 30 Vintage Photos That Will Change Your Perception of Women Factory Workers in WWII

Jennifer Conerly - November 10, 2017

We Can Do It! 30 Vintage Photos That Will Change Your Perception of Women Factory Workers in WWII
A real-life “Rosie the Riveter” operating a hand drill at Vultee-Nashville, Tennessee, working on an A-31 Vengeance dive bomber. Photographed by Alfred T. Palmer, ca. February 1943. Library of Congress. Wikipedia.
We Can Do It! 30 Vintage Photos That Will Change Your Perception of Women Factory Workers in WWII
Riveting team working on the cockpit shell of a C-47 transport at the plant of North American Aviation, Inc. Inglewood, California. Photographed by Alfred T. Palmer, 1942. Library of Congress. Wikimedia Commons.
We Can Do It! 30 Vintage Photos That Will Change Your Perception of Women Factory Workers in WWII
The production of Merlin engines at a Rolls Royce Factory. Female workers attach the induction manifolds to the cylinder blocks, prior to the blocks being fitted to the engine, at this aircraft engine factory in Britain. Photographed by Richard Stone, 1942. Wikimedia Commons.
We Can Do It! 30 Vintage Photos That Will Change Your Perception of Women Factory Workers in WWII
Woman aircraft worker, Vega Aircraft Corporation, Burbank, Calif. Photographed by David Bransby, June 1942. Library of Congress. Wikimedia Commons.
We Can Do It! 30 Vintage Photos That Will Change Your Perception of Women Factory Workers in WWII
Women at work on bomber, Douglas Aircraft Company, Long Beach, Calif. Photographed by Alfred T. Palmer, October 1942. Library of Congress. Wikimedia Commons.
We Can Do It! 30 Vintage Photos That Will Change Your Perception of Women Factory Workers in WWII
Women in War. Summer Canning Workers. Food to Make America Strong. Women near Rochelle, Illinois, many of them schoolteachers and pupils, work in asparagus canning factories during the summer months. Photographed by Ann Rosener, September 1942. Library of Congress.
We Can Do It! 30 Vintage Photos That Will Change Your Perception of Women Factory Workers in WWII
Women Aircraft Workers. One of the hundreds of young women employed in a West Coast aircraft factory applies identifying marking tape to plumbing sub-assemblies. Photographed by David Bransby, May 1942. Library of Congress.
We Can Do It! 30 Vintage Photos That Will Change Your Perception of Women Factory Workers in WWII
Pregnant wartime worker Irene Stacey visits the nurse in a clinic attached to the factory where she works in Bristol, England. Photographed by Richard Stone, 1942. Wikipedia Commons.
We Can Do It! 30 Vintage Photos That Will Change Your Perception of Women Factory Workers in WWII
Naval air base, Corpus Christi, Texas. Pearl Harbor widows have gone into war work to carry on the fight with a personal vengeance. Mrs. Virginia Young (right), whose husband was one of the first casualties of World War II, is a supervisor in the assembly and repairs department of the naval airbase at Corpus Christi, Texas. Her job is to find convenient and comfortable living quarters for women workers from out of state, like Ethel Mann, who operates an electric drill. Photographed by Howard R. Hollem, August 1942. Library of Congress.
We Can Do It! 30 Vintage Photos That Will Change Your Perception of Women Factory Workers in WWII
Women aircraft workers. Uncle Sam’s fighting men can thank the girls they left behind for the great job they’re doing on America’s production line. These two young women are working on the control column of a giant bomber at one of the West Coast’s aircraft factories. Photographed by David Bransby, May 1942. Library of Congress.
We Can Do It! 30 Vintage Photos That Will Change Your Perception of Women Factory Workers in WWII
Mrs. Sylvia Wood, of Filton Avenue, serves tea to a female worker at an aircraft factory in Bristol, England, where she works part-time. According to the original caption, Mrs. Wood’s two children eat their dinner at school, and she says: “I’d rather be out doing something to help the war, than at home doing nothing.” Unknown photographer, 1942. Wikimedia Commons.
We Can Do It! 30 Vintage Photos That Will Change Your Perception of Women Factory Workers in WWII
Moscow, USSR (Union of Socialist Soviet Republics). A worker in one of Moscow’s factories, where thousands of women have replaced men on machines of all kinds. Unknown photographer, 1941. Library of Congress.
We Can Do It! 30 Vintage Photos That Will Change Your Perception of Women Factory Workers in WWII
Martha Bryant and Eulalie Hampden operating a bolt-cutting machine. Photographed by Alfred T. Palmer, 1943. Library of Congress.
We Can Do It! 30 Vintage Photos That Will Change Your Perception of Women Factory Workers in WWII
Women War Workers Clock in at a British Gun Factory. Unknown Photographer, ca. 1939-1945. Wikimedia Commons.
We Can Do It! 30 Vintage Photos That Will Change Your Perception of Women Factory Workers in WWII
Factory worker among steel helmets produced during the Second World War. Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Unknown photographer, 1939-1945. Wikimedia Commons.

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