30 Eye-Opening Facts About Average Life During The Great Depression
30 Eye-Opening Facts About Average Life During The Great Depression

30 Eye-Opening Facts About Average Life During The Great Depression

Trista - December 22, 2018

30 Eye-Opening Facts About Average Life During The Great Depression
A female factory worker in 1942, Fort Worth, Texas. Women entered the workforce as men were drafted into the armed forces. Howard R. Hollem/US Library of Congress/Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain.

8. You Most Likely Married Later

As a result of the Great Depression, many couples chose to marry later than their parents had because they could not support themselves. The birth rate also dropped, as families could no longer provide for their children. In the poorest parts of Appalachia, children were so hungry that they would chew on their hands.

30 Eye-Opening Facts About Average Life During The Great Depression
John D. Rockefeller and his son John Jr. in 1915. American Press Association/Library of Congress/Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain.

7. However, Perhaps You Were Not Affected

As much as 40% of the country was not affected by the Great Depression, and some businesses benefited. Oil tycoons in particular, such as John D. Rockefeller and Andrew Carnegie, and their offspring were able to capitalize on the economic woes of others and thereby expand their businesses.

30 Eye-Opening Facts About Average Life During The Great Depression
Stalled on the desert, facing a future in California. No money, ten children. From Chickasaw, Oklahoma, 1937. Dorothea Lange/History In Photos.

6. Your Hopes Were Most Likely Crushed in 1936

By 1936, the economic reforms implemented by FDR’s New Deal had turned the country around so much that the economic indicators, such as employment, were at the same level as they were before the Depression. He scaled back government spending, and the country fell back into decline.

30 Eye-Opening Facts About Average Life During The Great Depression
Crowds outside the Bank of United States in New York after its failure in 1931. World Telegram staff photographer/Library of Congress/New York World-Telegram & Sun Collection/Wikimedia Commons.

5. Maybe You Went on Strike

There were challenges working people faced during the Great Depression, to say the least; those years were some of the essential reasons for the development of workers’ rights. Workers successfully managed to organize strikes and gain power through unions. Many laws were changed as Americans came to realize that workers were the strength of a democratic government.

30 Eye-Opening Facts About Average Life During The Great Depression
Shacks on the Anacostia flats, Washington, D.C. put up by the Bonus Army (World War I veterans) burning after the battle with the 1,000 soldiers accompanied by tanks and machine guns, 1932. Signal Corps Photographer/National Archives and Records Administration/Wikimedia Commons.

4. You Might Have Radicalized

Economic woes are one of the biggest reasons people turn to radical political ideologies. In 1929, Josef Stalin predicted that the communist party in the USA would lead a revolt to overturn the government. He was almost right – many people turned to communist ideology, thinking that it would reverse the Great Depression.

30 Eye-Opening Facts About Average Life During The Great Depression
Image from the Great Depression. Jono Bellwood.

3. You Probably Pulled All Your Money Out of the Bank

In the weeks following the 1929 crash, people who were desperate to retain whatever money they had left withdrew all of their funds out of their banks. Economic analysts suggest that rather than the crash causing the depression, it was actually the runs on the banks that created it.

30 Eye-Opening Facts About Average Life During The Great Depression
Women dressed up during the Great Depression in the 1930s. Vintage Handbook.

2. You Probably Accessorized

During the Roaring Twenties, women frequently wore expensive, glitzy dresses that showed off their wealth. During the Depression, though, fashions changed to accommodate those who no longer had any money. Accessories became important in the fashion industry during this time because people could dress up otherwise plain clothes for less money.

30 Eye-Opening Facts About Average Life During The Great Depression
A photograph of country superstar Johnny Cash as a child. Country Music Video Directory.

1. Maybe You Picked Cotton Like Johnny Cash and Others

Johnny Cash grew up in Arkansas during the Great Depression and recalled picking cotton from the time he was only five years old. Music was his favorite escape from the hardships of life during the time; he and his siblings often sang while they were working out in the fields.

 

Where Did We Find This Stuff? Here Are Our Sources:

“The Great Depression in Washington State.” University of Washington.

“50 Interesting Depression Facts,” by Karin Lehnardt. Fact Retriever. December 19, 2016.

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