Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government

Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government

Jacob Miller - October 3, 2017

The Weather Underground Organization, more commonly known as simply the Weather Underground, was a radical American militant left-wing organization. The Weather Underground organized in 1969 as a faction of the socialist group Students for a Democratic Society. The Weather denounced all other political ideologies as “objectively racist” if they did not side with the international proletariat, and that such political theories needed to be destroyed. Their goal was to create a revolutionary party to overthrow the U.S. Government.

The Weather Underground’s first public protest, known as the Days of Rage, took place on October 8, 1969, was a riot timed to coincide with the Chicago Seven trial, the trial of seven leftist revolutionaries charged with conspiracy and inciting to riot after an anti-Vietnam War protest in 1968. Two days prior to the Days of Rage, on October 6, the Weather Underground planted a bomb at the statue commemorating the police casualties incurred in the 1886 Haymarket Riot in Chicago. The memorial statue was rebuilt and bombed twice more by the extremists before being relocated to Chicago Police Headquarters.

In 1970, the radicals issued a “Declaration of a State of War” against the United States Government. The Weather Underground conducted a campaign of bombings through the mid-1970s and took part in breaking Dr. Timothy Leary out of prison. The bombing campaign targeted mostly government buildings, as well as several banks. The bombings were preceded by evacuation warnings and notices identifying what specifically the bombings intended to protest. No people were killed in any of the bombings except for three members of the group who were killed in when a bomb accidentally detonated in a Greenwich Village townhouse on March 6, 1970.

A few notable attacks perpetrated by the Weather Underground include the attack on February 21, 1970, when three Molotov cocktails exploded in front of the home of the New York Supreme Court Justice John Murtagh who was presiding over the hearings of the Panther 21, members of the Black Panther Party who had plotted to bomb New York landmarks and department stores. “Free the Panter 2” and “Viet Cong have won” were written on the sidewalk. The very same night, Molotov cocktails had also been thrown at the Colombia University’s International Law Library as well as the Charles Street Police Station.

On June 9, 1970, the Weather Underground bombed the New York City police station “in outraged response to the assassination of the [militant African American communist activist] George Jackson”

On March 1, 1971, the Weather Underground bombed the United States Capitol. They released a statement saying that the bombing was “in protest of the U.S. invasion of Laos.”

On May 19, 1972, the socialist terrorist organization bombed the Pentagon “in retaliation for the U.S. bombing raid in Hanoi.”

On October 20, 1981, some members of the Weather Underground who had joined splinter groups, helped the Black Liberation Army rob a Brinks armored truck containing $1.6 million. The robbery resulted in the deaths of three people including Waverly Brown, the first black police officer on the Nyack, NY police force.

“We’ve known that our job is to lead white kids into armed revolution. We never intended to spend the next five to twenty-five years of our lives in jail. Ever since SDS became revolutionary, we’ve been trying to show how it is possible to overcome frustration and impotence that comes from trying to reform this system. Kids know the lines are drawn: revolution is touching all of our lives. Tens of thousands have learned that protest and marches don’t do it. Revolutionary violence is the only way.”
— Bernardine Dohrn

Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
The Weather Underground symbol. Wikipedia
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
Weather Underground waged a strategic low-level war against the state that continued throughout much of the seventies. wrongkindofgreen
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
Kathy Boudin, second from right, is pictured in 1969 with members of Weather Underground, a radical group of American revolutionaries. Murderpedia
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
Bernardine Dohrn addresses a radical gathering in 1969. Picture- David Fenton Source- Getty Images
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
The Weather Underground was founded upon the principles of Marxist-Leninism, which is a political philosophy based on the ideas of Karl Marx and Vladimir I. Lenin. It seeks to establish socialist states and to develop them into self-sustaining, worker-led societies. Medium
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
WASHINGTON, April 8, 2013 ― “Two, four, six, eight, now it’s time to smash the state!” chanted the angry mob. One protestor climbed up a flagpole in front of the Justice Department. To the cheers and delight of the crowd, he cut down Old Glory and in its place raised a Viet Cong flag. Police fired tear gas. The mob chanted, “Tear the f***g state down!” thescottcarpdream
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
6:40 p.m. on June 9, a warning was called in, and 17 minutes later, the bomb exploded, destroying two walls and blasting a 20-by-40-foot hole in the floor in the NYPD Police Headquarters. NY Post
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
West 11th Street moments after an explosion in a townhouse that had been used by the Weathermen. Charles Lockwood: NY Times
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
After an explosion in a Weatherman bomb factory in Greenwich Village, March 1970. Credit Neal Boenzi: The New York Times
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
Three Weather Underground members were killed when a bomb they had built exploded in the basement of a townhouse in Greenwich Village on March 6, 1970. In the days following the explosion, police found 57 sticks of dynamite, four completed bombs, detonators, timing devices, and other bomb-making equipment. Bettmann/Corbis photo.
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
Outside the Greenwich Village “bomb factory” where three Weather Underground members were accidentally killed in 1970. (AP Photo/Jerry Mosey) Still, in June 1970 members bombed a New York City police department. In October, Dohrn was added to the FBI’s 10 most wanted list. On March 1, 1971, they bombed the US Capitol Building. On May 19, 1972, Ho Chi Minh’s birthday, a bomb erupted in a women’s bathroom at the Pentagon. The Weather Underground claimed responsibility, saying the event was “in retaliation for the U.S. bombing raid in Hanoi.” Pinterest
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
Actor Dustin Hoffman hurries away from his Greenwich Village townhouse with a painting he was able to save after three noontime blasts devastated an adjoining house at 18 W. 11th St. FRANK CASTORAL: NY Daily News

Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
Dustin Hoffman stands outside 18 West 11th Street in New York, which was destroyed by the explosion and next door to his own apartment, on March 6, 1970. Credit- AP Photo
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
Leaders of the Weathermen (left to right) Peter Clapp, John Jacobs, and Terry Robbins, march during the ‘Days of Rage’ actions in Chicago, 1969. David Fenton: Getty Images
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
Auguste Rodin’s “The Thinker” lays face down after members of the Weather Underground placed explosives at its base. The museum decided not to restore the mangled metal; the sculpture is still on display today. Cleveland, Ohio, March 24, 1970. Reddit
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
Chicago Police Haymarket Statue Statue designed by Frank Batchelder of St. Paul Minnesota in 1889 and sculpted by sculptor Johannes Gelert of NYC. The statue’s marble pedestal inscription is the command that Captain William Ward delivered in the Haymarket just before the bomb was thrown: “In the name of the People of Illinois, I command peace.” Funded by private funds raised by the Union League Club of Chicago. The statue is the first known US monument honoring policemen. October 6, 1969, the Weatherman planted a bomb that blew up a statue in Chicago built to commemorate police casualties incurred in the 1886 Haymarket Riot. The blast broke nearly 100 windows and scattered pieces of the statue onto the Kennedy Expressway below. The statue was rebuilt and unveiled on May 4, 1970 (coincidentally, the same day as the Kent State massacre), only to be blown up by the Weathermen a second time on October 6, 1970. The statue was rebuilt once again and Mayor Richard J. Daley posted a 24-hour police guard to protect it, but the statue was later destroyed again a third time. The monument was rebuilt and is located at Chicago Police Headquarters.
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
For the bombing of the US Capitol building, on March 1, 1971, the group issued a communique stating that the bombing was in protest of the U.S. invasion of Laos. For the bombing of the Pentagon, on May 19, 1972, they issued a communique stating that they were retaliating against the U.S. bombing raid in Hanoi. For January 29, 1975, bombing of the United States Department of State building, they issued a communique indicating that they were protesting the past escalation of the Vietnam conflict. Medium
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
Wanted poster for the Weather Underground Members Cathy Wilkerson, Bernadine Dohrn, Michael Spiegel, Kathy Boudin, Robert Roth, Judith Clark, Howard Machtinger, and Linda Evans. AP
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
FBI evidence photos document bomb-making supplies found in a Weather Underground safe house in Nob Hill in 1971. Max Nowel: SF Weekly
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
Brian McDonnell was killed by shrapnel in the 1970 bombing of Park Police Station. San Francisco Police Department
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
Bill Ayers mug shot. Chicago Police Department
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
Bernardine Dohrn, former leader of the radical, anti-war movement Weather Underground, and her companion Bill Ayers are escorted by federal authorities after surrendering at Cook County Courthouse in Chicago, Ill., Dec. 3, 1989. AP Photo
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
Suspects Cathy Boudin, David Gilbert, (who gave his name as James Hackforth) and Judith Clark are lead from Nyack Police Headquarters after their arraignment on felony murder charges. The Journal News File photo
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
Weather Underground member Katherine Boudin is led from Rockland County Courthouse in New City, New York, by sheriff’s officers in this Nov. 21, 1981. NY Daily News
Photos of the Radical Organization that Declared War on the United States Government
Kathy Boudin leaving prison on September 17, 2003. MARY ALTAFFER: AP

 

Sources For Further Reading:

The New York Times – ‘Days of Rage,’ by Bryan Burrough

Town & Country – The True Story Behind the Trial of the Chicago 7

Smithsonian Magazine – The True Story of ‘The Trial of the Chicago 7′

History Channel – Haymarket Riot

Mondo – Timothy Leary’s Great-ish Escape

The New York Times – A Radical ‘Declaration’ Warns of an Attack by Weathermen

BBC Channel – How the Weather Underground Failed at Revolution and Still Changed the World

Wyoming Public Media – Explosive Protests: U.S. Bombings During ‘Days of Rage’

NPR – How Young People Went Underground During the ’70s ‘Days of Rage’

Middle Tennessee State University – Chicago Seven Trial

Vanity Fair – How Ron Fliegelman Became the Weather Underground’s Bomb Guru?

The New York Times – I Was Part of the Weather Underground. Violence Is Not the Answer.

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