40 Facts About the Glorious Rise and Brutal Fall of Constantinople
40 Facts About the Glorious Rise and Brutal Fall of Constantinople

40 Facts About the Glorious Rise and Brutal Fall of Constantinople

Trista - July 11, 2019

40 Facts About the Glorious Rise and Brutal Fall of Constantinople
A mosaic of Empress Theodora. Wikimedia.

3. Empress Theodora Was a Boss

During the height of the Nika Riots, Emperor Justinian was preparing to flee the city to save himself. He knew the mob (and many of the Senators) wanted his head. He may well have escaped, ceding the city and perhaps the empire itself, to an upstart had it not been for his strong and commanding wife, Empress Theodora. She reported told Justinian, “Those who have worn the crown should never survive its loss. Never will I see the day when I am not saluted as empress.” These words caused Justinian to stay strong and keep control of the city.

40 Facts About the Glorious Rise and Brutal Fall of Constantinople
A portrait of Sultan Mehmed II. Wikimedia.

2. Mehmed Approaches

The final challenge to the Byzantine Empire and Christian control of Constantinople came in 1453, at the hands of Sultan Mehmed II. He led a vast army of over 200,000 soldiers and a fleet of at least 100 ships with cannons to besiege the city. Constantinople was greatly outnumbered and lacked the firepower of the Ottoman army.

40 Facts About the Glorious Rise and Brutal Fall of Constantinople
A painting of Sultan Mehmed II’s entry into Constantinople. Wikimedia.

1. Whoops, Left a Gate Open

Despite the superior numbers and firepower, Constantinople was not quick to fall. The city had survived the siege for two months when discontent began to spread among the Ottomans, with Mehmed’s Grand Vizier publicly criticizing the cost of the war effort. Then, a miracle (for the Ottomans) happened: someone left a gate open into the city, allowing the soldiers to walk right in, literally. To this day, historians aren’t sure how or why the gate was left open; if it was a raiding party returning to the city or a repair crew attempting to shore up a door. Regardless of the cause, it was the moment of fatal error that led to the fall of Constantinople.

 

Where did we find this stuff? Here are our sources:

“42 Epic Facts About Constantinople”, Kyle Climans, Factinate. October 22, 2018.

“10 Things You May Not Know About Constantinople”, Evan Andrews, History. June 2, 2016.

“Constantinople” Wikipedia contributors. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. April 2019.

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